Tutorial: Faux Milk Glass


I've seen a few different tutorials online for faux milk glass.  So, I decided to try it out.  After a lot of trial and error (even Martha's tutorial didn't work quite right), I decided to share with you what I found to work best. 

Tutorial: Faux Milk Glass
Supplies:
- Glass vase or bottle, preferably one you already have.  :)
- FolkArt Enamel Paint in white (not acrylic!)  You want to be able to put water in it, right? And this stuff is dishwasher safe.
- FolkArt Flow Medium
- a cup to mix the paint in
- something to stir with.  I used a paint brush

1.  Clean out your glass using soap and water and let dry
2.  Mix 2 parts paint with 1 part flow medium.  This is important because without the flow medium, the paint it too thick.  If you have thick paint step 4 will not work.
3.  Pour your paint into the glass vase/bottle.  You want enough paint to easily coat the inside
4.  Swirl to coat fully, then pour out excess. Wipe the rim clean with a damp cloth.
5.  Let dry for about an hour.
6.  Swirl again, and pour our any excess.
7.  Place in a cool oven, heat to 350 degrees.
8.  Bake for 30 min. and let cool in the oven.

Sit back and enjoy the pretty faux milk glass you made for next to nothing!

I love how the white enamel yields different shades depending on the tint of the glass.  That wine bottle had a hint of green and  I love that color it created.



11 comments:

  1. these are such a good idea. i'm going to school for floral design and i always need vases that are more inexpensive (more diy.)

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  2. Hi there! I love that your tutorial has tips I've never seen in other "paint inside a vase" tutorials! I just got 5 huge glass vases from Home Goods (for $55 - amazing price considering the size of these things) and I wanted to paint them to look like milk glass. One question I have about your steps - in step 6 you say to swirl again after it's dried for an hour in step 5...do you mean you pour a whole new 2nd coat of paint inside & swirl it again or are you just swirling any of the leftover paint that might have settled after it sets to dry? Hope that makes sense & isn't a silly question! :) I want to do it properly! Thanks so much!

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    1. Swirl again because it won't be dried completely. No need to add more paint, unless it seems like there isn't enough to cover the vase.

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    2. Hope that makes sense. Good luck. I would just do one vase first. Then once you've got the process figured out, I'd work on the others. You'll love how they turn out!

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  3. Thanks, Jen! Yep, makes perfect sense. I've done some smaller vases as tests before, so I'll try with this type of paint & method before I do the big vases. Can't wait to get started! Thanks again for the great tips & inspiration! :)

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  4. Can you do this for wine or drinking glasses? Is there a food safe paint for this?? Such an awesome idea!

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    1. I think it would work for drinking glasses, although it may not look as pretty on the inside as it does on the outside. Try it out and let me know how if turns out. The paint label says "dishwasher safe" and that's it. I might have to do a little more digging to see if its a "food safe" paint.

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    2. Hi, I just wanted to update that I found the enamel is not food safe. It recommends to do reverse painting on plates but for glasses I guess they can only be painted on the outside and not within 3/4 of an inch from the lip so it wouldn't have the same effect. I appreciate it, though! I actually got other colors to see how that would look and will be giving them as Christmas gifts if they turn out as gorgeous as the white. I Goodwill'ed some glass vases for $1 each so not a huge loss if it's not so great. I'm excited. I think I might do them tomorrow!

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  5. I'm just now trying this. They look beautiful on your blog. I have done one and there are a lot of air bubbles in my paint which leave air bubbles in the vase (only noticeable when the light shines in it). Did you have this problem?

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    1. Hi Karen. I didn't have this problem, but it might be because the paint is too thin. Maybe use a little less flow medium. :)

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